ALOHA FROM HAWAII,

                                       MY GRANDFATHER WAS BORN IN SZABO ROMANIA. THEREFORE, A TRUE BLOODLINE GYPSY, THAT MOVED TO AMERICA BEFORE THE GERMAN OCCUPATION, AND LEARNED HOW TO USE OIL/CANVAS, TO CREATE. MY FATHER WAS AN AVID STUDENT, AND MENTORED ME IN MY YOUTH, TO CARRY ON THIS TRADITION. THE PROCESS OF PAINTING BEGINS WITH A CANVAS THAT IS PREPARED WITH A LEVEL OF "GESSO" PREPARED OUT OF A RABBIT SKINS GLUE IN A TIME HONORED METHOD OF APPLICATION.

   1. HUNT A RABBIT FOR DINNER AND SKIN THE HIDE.

 

   2. SCRAPE THE HIDE AND PLACE THE SCRAPPINGS IN A POT THAT IS PLACED IN A DOUBLE BOILER, COOKING AT A MODERATE HEAT, WITH WATER ADDED TO CREATE A LIQUID CONSISTANCY OF GRAVY. STIR IT, OCCASIONALLY ADDING WATER TO AVOID BURNING.

 

   3. LET IT COOL AND THAN USE A SHAVING BRUSH FOR APPLICATION 3 TIMES OVER EVERY INCH OF THE MATERIAL YOU INTEND ON PAINTING. CLOTH LIKE CANVAS, LINEN, COTTON, BURLAP, OR BOARD.

 

   4. WHILE ALL THAT IS GOING ON YOU CUT UP THE RABBIT AND PLACE IT IN THE STEW POT WITH GARLIC ONIONS, AND HERBS, PLUS A CARROT OR TWO, AND POTATOES. OPEN A FINE BOTTLE OF WINE AND POUR A HALF GLASS INTO THE STEW, WITH SEA-SALT, AND FRESH GROUND PEPPER. BON APPITITE...................

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This is really fabulous. With your permission I'd like to post it to my blog, at: http://ArtistMarketingSalon.wordpress.com
and give use your name and a link to you site (if you provide on for me).

Great recipe! Artists combine tasks and artists work all the time, and artist use everything, and use their time wisely.

I have made cooked gesso from rabbit skin glue, but I bought the rabbit skin glue dry from Sinopia.com
ALOHA FROM HAWAII, YES TO ANYTHING YOUR HEART DESIRES!!!!!

Richard Gins reply adds more because I forgot about the whitening agent and sometimes my Father would add egg white for more gloss.
I liked your narrative but I cannot tell if it was meant to be fun and funny. I say this because you only presented the first part of the process. Your description was for a Rabbit skin glue sizing of the material which on must usually do before applying subsequent layers. In the case of a gesso, the glue is the binding material. Traditional, rabbit skin glues or hide glues were boiled as you said, usually in a double boiler, controlling carefully the amount of water and glue, achieving just the right consistency. When it was hot, then plaster of Paris or whiting was added to the glue mixture in the right amounts to produce an opaque, even gesso that will cover evenly, absorb well and bond permanently with the oil paint that is later applied on top. I only write this as I felt those reading your narrative needed the last ingredient to fully understand this long standing traditional artist technique of making gesso.
FUN AND FUNNY IS WHAT MY LIFE IS ABOUT.....YES I FORGOT THE WHITENING.....THANK YOU FOR THE CORRECTION.....YOUR INTELLIGENCE PRECEEDS YOU......ALOHA
Thanks Thomas for your gracious response. Fun and funny are good and I support this whole heartedly. I wish I was having fun in Hawaii with you, eating fresh pineapple and talking about art. I do have a tropical paradise of my own in Costa Rica and wish I was there right now. Please take a look at my work as I would like to share it with you. Aloha

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